Discussion:
Tree Extinctions Is Natcheral
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Bret Cahill
2018-06-12 12:37:07 UTC
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"The remarkable, long-lived baobab tree has a short, swollen trunk, wide-spreading branches and a large, round canopy. Almost all parts of the baobab are useful for human beings, with fruits and leaves being the most important for food and nutrition security of local communities

"The naturally dry, whitish fruit pulp has five times the vitamin C concentration of an orange, and is high in minerals such as calcium, magnesium and iron. It can be eaten fresh or processed into porridge, juice, jam, ice cream and sweets. The seeds are rich in protein and fat and can be roasted and eaten as a tasty snack or pressed into oil for consumption and industrial use, particularly for cosmetic products. The leaves have high protein, beta-carotene and iron content and are used fresh as leafy vegetables or dried and powdered as a soup ingredient."

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/341c7856-4160-39dc-8526-cc0e7f08df58/ss_africa%E2%80%99s-most-famous-trees.html
Paul Aubrin
2018-06-12 15:33:22 UTC
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Post by Bret Cahill
"The remarkable, long-lived baobab tree has a short, swollen trunk,
wide-spreading branches and a large, round canopy. Almost all parts of
the baobab are useful for human beings, with fruits and leaves being the
most important for food and nutrition security of local communities
Wood species in North Carolina:
https://www.ncpedia.org/forests-part-2-important-north

If you want to see them (as wood pellets), you can go to the Drax power
station (North Yorkshire 53°44′9″N 0°59′47″W).
JTEM is right
2018-06-12 18:30:18 UTC
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Bret Cahill wrote:

[-tree extinction-]

Again, another symptom of increased population.

...the more people, the more demand for land
as well as wood products.

If this is a problem, of course, then the solution
is to murder off billions of people, and impoverish
the rest... so they can't afford "Luxuries" like
meat or wood.




-- --

http://jtem.tumblr.com/post/174758090023
Byker
2018-06-12 21:59:26 UTC
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Post by JTEM is right
[-tree extinction-]
Again, another symptom of increased population.
...the more people, the more demand for land as well as wood products.
If this is a problem, of course, then the solution is to murder off
billions of people, and impoverish the rest... so they can't afford
"Luxuries" like meat or wood.
A Deep Ecologist Who Advocates Genocide

Among his following are many of the eco-activists and deep ecologists of
Earth First!, including their apparent leader, Dave Foreman, who in an
interview with Bill Devall in the Australian magazine Simply Living said,
regarding starvation in Ethiopia, that “the best thing would be to just let
nature seek its own balance, to let the people there just starve...” Giving
aid would of course only spur the Malthusian cycle, thus “what’s going to
happen in ten years time is that twice as many people will suffer and die.”
Notice how Malthusian brutality is couched in the terms of humanitarian
concern.

“Likewise,” he said, “letting the USA be an overflow valve for problems in
Latin America is not solving a thing. It’s just putting more pressure on the
resources we have in the USA... and it isn’t helping the problems in Latin
America.” Notice here how rapidly the “anti-anthropocentrist” reverts to a
nationalist resource manager. But his entire formulation, like those of
Abbey and Hardin, reverses social reality and conceals the real sources of
hunger, resource pressures, and refugees.

Central America is being devastated by U.S. corporate exploitation and a
genocidal war to make sure the plunder continues. One horrible example is
the U.S.-caused war in El Salvador, defending a death-squad government that
would likely collapse in weeks without U.S. backing. The war has forced one
quarter of the Salvadoran population to become refugees, and a half-million
of them have fled to the U.S. Comments like Foreman’s might not be quite so
obscene if there were consistent coverage in his newspaper of U.S.
exploitation in Central America (apart from the occasional material on
rainforests, usually in a Rainforest Action Network supplement) and
denunciations of the U.S. annihilation of the Salvadoran people, cultures,
and lands, but there is no antiwar component in the paper and little about
these interrelated problems in Central America. Foreman, too, ought to be
utterly ashamed, but Foreman, too, has a following.

When Devall asked Foreman why the mainstream environmental movement had not
addressed the population issue, the reply was, “you can’t get any reaction.”
Foreman appeared to be implying that no serious dialogue could be generated
on it, but if so, he was being less than candid. In the summer of 1986 I
sent a friendly but critical letter to Earth First! which criticized
contemporary Malthusianism and warned them to “not make the mistake of
advocating the genocide that the industrial system is already carrying out.”
It was never printed, nor did it receive any response, though in subsequent
issues Foreman stressed the need for an exchange of ideas and diverse points
of view, describing the paper as “a forum of the deep ecology/ Earth First!
movement.”

I sent another letter questioning why mine was never printed, pointing out
the problems with Foreman’s comments on immigration and Ethiopia, and
warning Earth First! to avoid becoming “vanguardist” by suppressing the
diverse views it claims to want and which undoubtedly exist within the
deep-ecology current. I finally received a note from Foreman himself,
groaning, “Gawd, I’m bored with left-wing humanist rhetoric.” In answer to
my question about open discussion on the population issue, he replied, “My
honest feeling is that the vast majority of those who consider themselves
Earth First!ers agree with my position. ... I am all for cooperation with
other groups where it fits, but we have a particular point of view which we
are trying to articulate. Call it fascist if you like, but I am more
interested in bears, rain-forests, and whales than in people.”

Well, its certainly Foreman’s business to print, or not print, whatever he
likes. And since I have access to publications myself, I gave up attempting
an open and egalitarian discussion with him and decided to research deep
ecology and the hunger question further. It was later that his comments on
Ethiopia and related issues came to my attention, but they heightened my
sense of unease with the direct-action environmental group that had
previously earned my respect and praise in the Fifth Estate.

While Foreman’s presumptuousness about speaking for the “vast majority” of
Earth First! (and by extension, deep ecologists and even other species) is
only manipulation, his acceptance of the fascist label is telling. There is
a definite connection between fascism and his perception of world corporate
genocide as nature taking its course. It is also fascistic to call for an
end to immigration and the closing of borders, especially to exclude those
who are fleeing a war waged by one’s own country. (Perhaps Earth First! will
volunteer to help round up those courageous people in the Sanctuary movement
who, in the best tradition of the antislavery underground railroad, are
aiding the refugees. Or they can help the KKK apprehend Guatemalan Indians,
an animist, land-based people, fleeing a holocaust perpetrated with the
active involvement of the U.S.) And, finally, smearing all anticapitalism or
critiques of global corporate empire as “an ossified leftist worldview that
blames everything on the corporations” (as Foreman does in the March 1987
Earth First!) is reminiscent of the anticommunist pseudoradicalism of the
Nazis themselves. Certainly, “capitalists are not the only problem”
(Foreman, in the June 1987 Earth First!). But Foreman should realize that
the problem won’t be resolved as long as capital exists. To deny the
connection between chopping down trees and chopping down peasants is to show
willful ignorance and to act in silent complicity with murderers.

https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/george-bradford-how-deep-is-deep-ecology#toc15
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