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netherlands ponders world's toughest climate law
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M***@kymhorsell.com
2018-07-09 10:31:41 UTC
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<https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/7/6/17535720/netherlands-dutch-climate-law-paris-targets>

The Netherlands contemplates the world's toughest climate law

A new Dutch proposal would put climate at the center of national politics.

David Roberts
08 Jul 2018, 8:23am EDT

A coalition of 7 Dutch political parties recently unveiled a
climate policy proposal that is breathtaking in its ambition. If it
becomes law, it will codify the most stringent targets for greenhouse
gas reductions of any country in the world.

There are still several steps between the proposal and passage,
including debate in both houses of Parliament, and lawmakers may make
changes. But given the broad political support -- the parties involved
control 113 of 150 seats in Parliament -- it is widely expected to
pass in something like its current form by late next summer.

It would be the world's eighth national climate law (after the UK,
Mexico, Denmark, Finland, France, Norway, and Sweden), but it boasts a
few features that make it particularly notable.

It's bipartisan! Or rather, heptapartisan.

Here in the US, we've grown depressingly accustomed to climate battles
breaking down along partisan lines: Democrats push (inadequate)
solutions; Republicans deny that the problem exists or that anything
needs to be done about it.

In contrast, the Dutch proposal is supported by a coalition of parties
ranging from the far left to the center-right, together representing a
large majority of seats in the Dutch Parliament. (One notable absence:
the right-wing populist party, Party for Freedom, led by notorious
Islamophobe Geert Wilders.) The current prime minister, Mark Rutte,
leads the center-right People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD),
which is one of the bill's primary supporters.

The proposal represents a degree of social and political consensus
that is almost unthinkable in the US -- not only that climate change
is "real" (an absurd debate only the US is having), but that it's
urgent and that national policy should support the goals agreed to in
Paris. Those goals obligate developed countries like the Netherlands
to virtually eliminate carbon emissions by mid-century.

...

--
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STEM standards is a "long term trend" over the past 30 years that has
also seen students in high school and college *taking* science and math
significantly declining. The fed govt says if they have enough money
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find the sports master trying to teach math students to multiply
matrices when he clearly didn't know how to do it himself. The physics
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The Netherlands contemplates the world's toughest climate law
Vox

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JTEM is right
2018-07-09 12:27:19 UTC
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Raw Message
There's no such thing as a climate law.

Ever.

There are, however, plenty of energy laws.

The difference?

Energy laws address the dwindling supply of
fossil fuels, and the need to find alternatives.

"Climate laws" are name they apply to energy
laws so that the retarded people will beg for
a carbon tax, subsidizing the wealthy.





-- --

http://jtem.tumblr.com/post/175633238677
Bret Cahill
2018-07-09 18:08:57 UTC
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Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
<https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/7/6/17535720/netherlands-dutch-climate-law-paris-targets>
The Netherlands contemplates the world's toughest climate law
A new Dutch proposal would put climate at the center of national politics.
David Roberts
08 Jul 2018, 8:23am EDT
A coalition of 7 Dutch political parties recently unveiled a
climate policy proposal that is breathtaking in its ambition.
Actually it's not so breath taking. What we are seeing is the total collapse of the geo extraction mindset before the info age.
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
If it
becomes law, it will codify the most stringent targets for greenhouse
gas reductions of any country in the world.
The fact that it's immediately good for the economy may play some role as well.
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
There are still several steps between the proposal and passage,
including debate in both houses of Parliament, and lawmakers may make
changes. But given the broad political support -- the parties involved
control 113 of 150 seats in Parliament -- it is widely expected to
pass in something like its current form by late next summer.
It would be the world's eighth national climate law (after the UK,
Mexico, Denmark, Finland, France, Norway, and Sweden), but it boasts a
few features that make it particularly notable.
It's bipartisan! Or rather, heptapartisan.
Here in the US, we've grown depressingly accustomed to climate battles
breaking down along partisan lines: Democrats push (inadequate)
solutions; Republicans deny that the problem exists or that anything
needs to be done about it.
The problem with nat'l Dems is Job One at the _New York Times_ is to sell a "package" to its "sponsors," namely, preserving the status quo by carrot and sticking nat'l Dems.

The _Times_ knows ideas that might impact the economy are the camel's nose under the tent. If a legacy media Democrat like Biden even whispers the word "idea" a bevy of clerics at the _Times_ will issue fatwas against him.

Hillary, possibly deliberately, stepped over the line 3 years ago when she said, "elections are competitions of ideas." This was seen as a direct attack on the _Times_ shilldom. As CJR pointed out, the _New York Times_ subsequently devoted more column inches to Emailgate than all of tRUMP's scandals combined.

All legacy media Dems fear the _Times_ more than losing elections which is why they come off with the personality of a "wet piece of cardboard" as David Letterman put it. Bill Clinton is the exception which is why, as _Rolling Stone_ pointed out, the _Times_ still suffers from Clinton derangement syndrome.

Soros needs to think about this more. Mebbe get a copy of _Democracy In America_.


Bret Cahill

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