Discussion:
Peter Ridd wins case against James Cook University
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Chom Noamsky
2019-04-16 08:29:39 UTC
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Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.

Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.

This is a pretty big deal because it will be used a reference case
anywhere academic freedom is being squelched and critics silenced, which
is pretty much everywhere these days.

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/04/15/victory-climate-skeptic-scientist-peter-ridd-wins-big/
columbiaaccidentinvestigation
2019-04-16 17:01:07 UTC
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Post by Chom Noamsky
Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.
Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.
This is a pretty big deal because it will be used a reference case
anywhere academic freedom is being squelched and critics silenced, which
is pretty much everywhere these days.
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/04/15/victory-climate-skeptic-scientist-peter-ridd-wins-big/
Taking care of salt water reef tanks means keeping ph high correct?
R Kym Horsell
2019-04-16 17:15:26 UTC
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Post by columbiaaccidentinvestigation
Post by Chom Noamsky
Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.
Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.
Lie. Only on the claim his dismissal was against unfair dismissal laws.

It's allays fun to see right wing dropkicks suddenly start supporting
worker's rights when it's "one of their own".
Post by columbiaaccidentinvestigation
Post by Chom Noamsky
This is a pretty big deal because it will be used a reference case
anywhere academic freedom is being squelched and critics silenced, which
is pretty much everywhere these days.
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/04/15/victory-climate-skeptic-scientist-peter-ridd-wins-big/
Taking care of salt water reef tanks means keeping ph high correct?
--
http://www.ipcc.ch/ipccreports/tar/wg2/index.php?idp=557#15213

Possible changes in runoff patterns, coupled with apparent recent trends in
societal vulnerability to floods in parts of North America, suggest that flood
risks may increase as a result of anthropogenic climate change (see Section
15.2.5). Changes in snowpack accumulation and the timing of melt-off are
likely to affect the seasonal distribution and characteristics of flood events
in some areas. For example, in mountainous western watersheds, winter and
early spring flood events may become more frequent (Melack et al., 1997;
Lettenmaier et al., 1999). In southeastern Canadian and northeastern
U.S. watersheds, reductions in winter snowpacks and river ice will tend to
reduce winter and spring flood risks (Bruce et al., 2000), where at present
"rain-on-snow and snowmelt floods can be the largest and most destructive
stormflow events in the region" (Platt et al., 2000). However, Canadian rivers
in northern areas may begin to experience winter ice break-ups and associated
flooding (Bruce et al., 2000).

In inflation-adjusted terms, average annual flood damage has increased in the
United States over the past few decades. This increasing trend in damages
appears to be related to increases in population and the value of developed
property in floodplains, as well as changes in precipitation characteristics,
with perhaps as much as 80% of the trend attributable to population and wealth
changes (Pielke and Downton, 2000). Measured as a proportion of real tangible
wealth, average annual flood damages have been roughly constant over time
(Pielke and Downton, 2000). This ongoing vulnerability comes despite the fact
that various federal, state, and local governments and private entities have
built approximately 40,000 km of levees along the rivers and streams of the
United States-a combined total distance that is long enough to encircle the
Earth at the equator (Pielke, 1999).

Recent severe flood events-particularly the 1993 Mississippi River floods, the
1996 Saguenay flood, the 1997 Red River flood, and winter flooding in
California in 1997-have led to reexaminations of traditional approaches to
flood management. For example, a U.S. federal interagency task force was
formed in the wake of the 1993 floods, and its recommendations have
contributed to altered federal practices (IFMRC, 1994). In an assessment of
the 1993 floods, which caused on the order of US$18 billion in damages,
Changnon (1996) notes that the extreme and prolonged flooding had significant
and unexpected impacts that defied previous experience and design
extremes. Changnon further concludes that many systems for monitoring and
predicting flood conditions were inadequate; that incomplete or incorrect
information was released during the flood; and that many previous approaches
to mitigate flood losses failed. He also identifies benefits, including
benefits to the natural ecosystem of the Mississippi floodplain.
columbiaaccidentinvestigation
2019-04-16 17:19:43 UTC
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Post by R Kym Horsell
Post by columbiaaccidentinvestigation
Post by Chom Noamsky
Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.
Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.
Lie. Only on the claim his dismissal was against unfair dismissal laws.
It's allays fun to see right wing dropkicks suddenly start supporting
worker's rights when it's "one of their own".
Well said!
Post by R Kym Horsell
Post by columbiaaccidentinvestigation
Post by Chom Noamsky
This is a pretty big deal because it will be used a reference case
anywhere academic freedom is being squelched and critics silenced, which
is pretty much everywhere these days.
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/04/15/victory-climate-skeptic-scientist-peter-ridd-wins-big/
Taking care of salt water reef tanks means keeping ph high correct?
--
http://www.ipcc.ch/ipccreports/tar/wg2/index.php?idp=557#15213
Possible changes in runoff patterns, coupled with apparent recent trends in
societal vulnerability to floods in parts of North America, suggest that flood
risks may increase as a result of anthropogenic climate change (see Section
15.2.5). Changes in snowpack accumulation and the timing of melt-off are
likely to affect the seasonal distribution and characteristics of flood events
in some areas. For example, in mountainous western watersheds, winter and
early spring flood events may become more frequent (Melack et al., 1997;
Lettenmaier et al., 1999). In southeastern Canadian and northeastern
U.S. watersheds, reductions in winter snowpacks and river ice will tend to
reduce winter and spring flood risks (Bruce et al., 2000), where at present
"rain-on-snow and snowmelt floods can be the largest and most destructive
stormflow events in the region" (Platt et al., 2000). However, Canadian rivers
in northern areas may begin to experience winter ice break-ups and associated
flooding (Bruce et al., 2000).
In inflation-adjusted terms, average annual flood damage has increased in the
United States over the past few decades. This increasing trend in damages
appears to be related to increases in population and the value of developed
property in floodplains, as well as changes in precipitation characteristics,
with perhaps as much as 80% of the trend attributable to population and wealth
changes (Pielke and Downton, 2000). Measured as a proportion of real tangible
wealth, average annual flood damages have been roughly constant over time
(Pielke and Downton, 2000). This ongoing vulnerability comes despite the fact
that various federal, state, and local governments and private entities have
built approximately 40,000 km of levees along the rivers and streams of the
United States-a combined total distance that is long enough to encircle the
Earth at the equator (Pielke, 1999).
Recent severe flood events-particularly the 1993 Mississippi River floods, the
1996 Saguenay flood, the 1997 Red River flood, and winter flooding in
California in 1997-have led to reexaminations of traditional approaches to
flood management. For example, a U.S. federal interagency task force was
formed in the wake of the 1993 floods, and its recommendations have
contributed to altered federal practices (IFMRC, 1994). In an assessment of
the 1993 floods, which caused on the order of US$18 billion in damages,
Changnon (1996) notes that the extreme and prolonged flooding had significant
and unexpected impacts that defied previous experience and design
extremes. Changnon further concludes that many systems for monitoring and
predicting flood conditions were inadequate; that incomplete or incorrect
information was released during the flood; and that many previous approaches
to mitigate flood losses failed. He also identifies benefits, including
benefits to the natural ecosystem of the Mississippi floodplain.
R Kym Horsell
2019-04-16 17:53:12 UTC
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Post by columbiaaccidentinvestigation
Post by R Kym Horsell
Post by Chom Noamsky
Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.
Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.
Lie. Only on the claim his dismissal was against unfair dismissal laws.
It's allays fun to see right wing dropkicks suddenly start supporting
worker's rights when it's "one of their own".
Well said!
...
Maybe I'm over-sensitive to talking heads with "transactional views" since
we're a week into campaigning for a federal election over here.

A certain chunk of the political spectrum seems to daily underline
they have no fixed principles but make decisions on requirements de jour.
They sail on apparently not understanding or maybe just not caring they are
signaling they can't be trusted on any position. Whatever they say they will
reverse it if and when it benefits them short term.

I dont know whether you know of anyone like that. ;)

Well... we'll see what happens on May 18 when AUS is supposed to
get out and vote.
JTEM is Remarkably Flexible
2019-04-16 17:31:55 UTC
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Post by Chom Noamsky
Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.
Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.
This is a pretty big deal because it will be used a reference case
anywhere academic freedom is being squelched and critics silenced, which
is pretty much everywhere these days.
It is a big deal. If money is involved, and you punish someone for doing
their job correctly instead of falling in line with the status quo, you will
likely face bad consequences.




-- --

http://jtem.tumblr.com/post/184207504573
Chom Noamsky
2019-04-16 18:26:14 UTC
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Post by JTEM is Remarkably Flexible
Post by Chom Noamsky
Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.
Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.
This is a pretty big deal because it will be used a reference case
anywhere academic freedom is being squelched and critics silenced, which
is pretty much everywhere these days.
It is a big deal. If money is involved, and you punish someone for doing
their job correctly instead of falling in line with the status quo, you will
likely face bad consequences.
Some typical options for dealing with a critic:

1) refute the critic
2) silence the critic
3) defame the critic

Options #2 and #3 are generally consequential to the failure of #1, so a
win in court amounts to a vindication of Ridd's criticism.

Where you see a lot of #2 & #3 behaviour is with cults. Like
Scientology, the clergy can't refute criticism of its whacky theology,
so the clergy aggressively persecutes in order to silence and/or defame
critics.

Many academic institutions have very much become like the Church of
Scientology.
columbiaaccidentinvestigation
2019-04-16 20:23:33 UTC
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Post by Chom Noamsky
Post by JTEM is Remarkably Flexible
Post by Chom Noamsky
Ridd was silenced, censured and fired because he criticized some shoddy
exaggerated claims about global warming impacts on the GBR.
Now it has all backfired very badly on the university and the court has
ruled in his favour on every claim.
This is a pretty big deal because it will be used a reference case
anywhere academic freedom is being squelched and critics silenced, which
is pretty much everywhere these days.
It is a big deal. If money is involved, and you punish someone for doing
their job correctly instead of falling in line with the status quo, you will
likely face bad consequences.
1) refute the critic
2) silence the critic
3) defame the critic
Options #2 and #3 are generally consequential to the failure of #1, so a
win in court amounts to a vindication of Ridd's criticism.
Where you see a lot of #2 & #3 behaviour is with cults. Like
Scientology, the clergy can't refute criticism of its whacky theology,
so the clergy aggressively persecutes in order to silence and/or defame
critics.
Many academic institutions have very much become like the Church of
Scientology.
Again, ridds point was to question the use of the great barrier reef as an indicator, which brings about the question of what happens to coral when the ph drops in a cold water tank system?

If supporters of his works cant answer that simple question it would seem we have some uninformed political hacks like chompers trying to make a big deal out of something he does not understand
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