Discussion:
EPA: Global Warming Will Kill Off The Rednecks and Improve The Gene Pool
(too old to reply)
Corrupt Radical Rightist SenaTURD Jimmy Inhofe
2019-03-17 22:50:12 UTC
Permalink
The Southeast spans diverse landscapes from the Appalachian Mountains to
expansive coastal plains.[1] Most states in this region are along either
the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in 29,000 miles of
coastline.[2] Over 80 million people live in the Southeast, many of whom
reside in cities, including Jacksonville, Charlotte, Atlanta, Miami, and
New Orleans. Eleven of the twenty fastest growing metropolitan areas in the
nation are found here.[3]

Climate change is causing increases in temperature across the Southeast.
Since 1970, average annual temperatures in the region have increased by
about 2°F, with the greatest warming occurring during the summer.[1]
Temperatures are projected to increase by 4°F to 8°F by the end of the
century. There are also more predicted days over 95°F and fewer predicted
freezing events. Across the Southeast, temperatures will vary somewhat over
space and time. Inland areas are projected to warm more than coasts.
Natural cycles, including the El Niño Southern Oscillation, tropical
weather systems, and differences in atmospheric pressure across key regions
of the Earth, are anticipated to drive short-term temperature fluctuations.
[1]
This graph compares historic patterns of days above 95°F from 1971-2000 to
future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario with high greenhouse gas
emissions. Most of Florida, southern Georgia, and northern Louisiana are
projected to increase by more than 40 days. Most of Arkansas, Mississippi,
Alabama, western Tennessee and Kentucky, northern Georgia, South Carolina,
eastern / central North Carolina, and southeastern Virginia are projected
to increase between 20 and 40 days. All remaining parts of the Southeast
are projected to increase between 0 and 20 days. View enlarged image

The number of days reaching temperatures over 95°F in the Southeast is
projected to increase during this century. This graph compares historic
patterns from 1971-2000 to future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario
with high greenhouse gas emissions. Adapted from: USGCRP (2014)[5]

Heavy downpours have also increased in the Southeast. There has also been a
substantial increase in the intensity, frequency, duration, and strength of
Atlantic hurricane activity since the 1980s, and further increases are
projected. However, in addition to some very wet periods, the region has
also experienced periods of extreme drying. Projecting future precipitation
for the Southeast is challenging because the region lies in the transition
between an increasingly wet northern region and a drying southwest.[1]
Areas in southwestern portion of the Southeast region may experience drier
conditions, while the northeastern areas may experience wetter conditions,
with natural variability having a strong influence on patterns across the
entire region.[1]


Impacts on Sea Level and Coastal Resources

Coastal populations and ecosystems in the Southeast are threatened by sea
level rise, more intense hurricanes, and storm surge. Rising sea levels are
driven by both increased warming of oceans and ground subsidence (sinking).
[1][4] Many locations in the Southeast are extremely vulnerable to the
impacts of sea level rise, including New Orleans and Miami. Projections
indicate that sea level will rise more rapidly throughout the rest of this
century and is expected to exacerbate existing threats in this region.[1]
Map of southeastern United States, which shows all coastal areas with a
moderate vulnerability to sea level rise. Mississippi, Louisiana,
Charleston, the Outer Banks, and Virginia Beach area show very high
vulnerability. The eastern and souther coasts of Florida show high
vulnerability. V


The Southeast experiences hurricanes from both the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane winds and storm surges have caused extreme
damage. In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused more than 1,800 deaths,
eroded more than 200 square miles of coastal land in Louisiana, and
destroyed personal property and public infrastructure.[4] Hurricane Katrina
alone caused an estimated $134 billion in damages. Average losses caused by
recent hurricane winds, land subsidence, and sea level rise are estimated
to be $14 billion per year.[1] These costs are expected to rise in the
future.

Sea level rise will erode shorelines, inundate wetlands, and impair the
operations of coastal infrastructure. Low-lying coastal areas are at higher
risk from frequent floods and storm surge. Low-lying inland areas could see
increased flooding from rain because stormwater drainage systems are at
risk of seawater inundation and slow draining.[1] The Southeast has
numerous cities, roads, rail systems, ports, airports, water supplies, and
oil and gas facilities located near sea level.[1] Damage to this
infrastructure will have large economic impacts.


https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts/southeast.html
BeamMeUpScotty
2019-03-17 22:54:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corrupt Radical Rightist SenaTURD Jimmy Inhofe
The Southeast spans diverse landscapes from the Appalachian Mountains to
expansive coastal plains.[1] Most states in this region are along either
the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in 29,000 miles of
coastline.[2] Over 80 million people live in the Southeast, many of whom
reside in cities, including Jacksonville, Charlotte, Atlanta, Miami, and
New Orleans. Eleven of the twenty fastest growing metropolitan areas in the
nation are found here.[3]
Climate change is causing increases in temperature across the Southeast.
Since 1970, average annual temperatures in the region have increased by
about 2°F, with the greatest warming occurring during the summer.[1]
Temperatures are projected to increase by 4°F to 8°F by the end of the
century. There are also more predicted days over 95°F and fewer predicted
freezing events. Across the Southeast, temperatures will vary somewhat over
space and time. Inland areas are projected to warm more than coasts.
Natural cycles, including the El Niño Southern Oscillation, tropical
weather systems, and differences in atmospheric pressure across key regions
of the Earth, are anticipated to drive short-term temperature fluctuations.
[1]
This graph compares historic patterns of days above 95°F from 1971-2000 to
future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario with high greenhouse gas
emissions. Most of Florida, southern Georgia, and northern Louisiana are
projected to increase by more than 40 days. Most of Arkansas, Mississippi,
Alabama, western Tennessee and Kentucky, northern Georgia, South Carolina,
eastern / central North Carolina, and southeastern Virginia are projected
to increase between 20 and 40 days. All remaining parts of the Southeast
are projected to increase between 0 and 20 days. View enlarged image
The number of days reaching temperatures over 95°F in the Southeast is
projected to increase during this century. This graph compares historic
patterns from 1971-2000 to future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario
with high greenhouse gas emissions. Adapted from: USGCRP (2014)[5]
Heavy downpours have also increased in the Southeast. There has also been a
substantial increase in the intensity, frequency, duration, and strength of
Atlantic hurricane activity since the 1980s, and further increases are
projected. However, in addition to some very wet periods, the region has
also experienced periods of extreme drying. Projecting future precipitation
for the Southeast is challenging because the region lies in the transition
between an increasingly wet northern region and a drying southwest.[1]
Areas in southwestern portion of the Southeast region may experience drier
conditions, while the northeastern areas may experience wetter conditions,
with natural variability having a strong influence on patterns across the
entire region.[1]
Impacts on Sea Level and Coastal Resources
Coastal populations and ecosystems in the Southeast are threatened by sea
level rise, more intense hurricanes, and storm surge. Rising sea levels are
driven by both increased warming of oceans and ground subsidence (sinking).
[1][4] Many locations in the Southeast are extremely vulnerable to the
impacts of sea level rise, including New Orleans and Miami. Projections
indicate that sea level will rise more rapidly throughout the rest of this
century and is expected to exacerbate existing threats in this region.[1]
Map of southeastern United States, which shows all coastal areas with a
moderate vulnerability to sea level rise. Mississippi, Louisiana,
Charleston, the Outer Banks, and Virginia Beach area show very high
vulnerability. The eastern and souther coasts of Florida show high
vulnerability. V
The Southeast experiences hurricanes from both the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane winds and storm surges have caused extreme
damage. In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused more than 1,800 deaths,
eroded more than 200 square miles of coastal land in Louisiana, and
destroyed personal property and public infrastructure.[4] Hurricane Katrina
alone caused an estimated $134 billion in damages. Average losses caused by
recent hurricane winds, land subsidence, and sea level rise are estimated
to be $14 billion per year.[1] These costs are expected to rise in the
future.
Sea level rise will erode shorelines, inundate wetlands, and impair the
operations of coastal infrastructure. Low-lying coastal areas are at higher
risk from frequent floods and storm surge. Low-lying inland areas could see
increased flooding from rain because stormwater drainage systems are at
risk of seawater inundation and slow draining.[1] The Southeast has
numerous cities, roads, rail systems, ports, airports, water supplies, and
oil and gas facilities located near sea level.[1] Damage to this
infrastructure will have large economic impacts.
https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts/southeast.html
Gays live along the coastlines... is there something divine in this
prediction?
--
That's Karma


tesla sTinker
2019-03-18 01:59:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Corrupt Radical Rightist SenaTURD Jimmy Inhofe
The Southeast spans diverse landscapes from the Appalachian Mountains to
expansive coastal plains.[1] Most states in this region are along either
the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in 29,000 miles of
coastline.[2] Over 80 million people live in the Southeast, many of whom
reside in cities, including Jacksonville, Charlotte, Atlanta, Miami, and
New Orleans. Eleven of the twenty fastest growing metropolitan areas in the
nation are found here.[3]
Climate change is causing increases in temperature across the Southeast.
Since 1970, average annual temperatures in the region have increased by
about 2°F, with the greatest warming occurring during the summer.[1]
Temperatures are projected to increase by 4°F to 8°F by the end of the
century. There are also more predicted days over 95°F and fewer predicted
freezing events. Across the Southeast, temperatures will vary somewhat over
space and time. Inland areas are projected to warm more than coasts.
Natural cycles, including the El Niño Southern Oscillation, tropical
weather systems, and differences in atmospheric pressure across key regions
of the Earth, are anticipated to drive short-term temperature fluctuations.
[1]
This graph compares historic patterns of days above 95°F from 1971-2000 to
future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario with high greenhouse gas
emissions. Most of Florida, southern Georgia, and northern Louisiana are
projected to increase by more than 40 days. Most of Arkansas, Mississippi,
Alabama, western Tennessee and Kentucky, northern Georgia, South Carolina,
eastern / central North Carolina, and southeastern Virginia are projected
to increase between 20 and 40 days. All remaining parts of the Southeast
are projected to increase between 0 and 20 days. View enlarged image
The number of days reaching temperatures over 95°F in the Southeast is
projected to increase during this century. This graph compares historic
patterns from 1971-2000 to future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario
with high greenhouse gas emissions. Adapted from: USGCRP (2014)[5]
Heavy downpours have also increased in the Southeast. There has also been a
substantial increase in the intensity, frequency, duration, and strength of
Atlantic hurricane activity since the 1980s, and further increases are
projected. However, in addition to some very wet periods, the region has
also experienced periods of extreme drying. Projecting future precipitation
for the Southeast is challenging because the region lies in the transition
between an increasingly wet northern region and a drying southwest.[1]
Areas in southwestern portion of the Southeast region may experience drier
conditions, while the northeastern areas may experience wetter conditions,
with natural variability having a strong influence on patterns across the
entire region.[1]
Impacts on Sea Level and Coastal Resources
Coastal populations and ecosystems in the Southeast are threatened by sea
level rise, more intense hurricanes, and storm surge. Rising sea levels are
driven by both increased warming of oceans and ground subsidence (sinking).
[1][4] Many locations in the Southeast are extremely vulnerable to the
impacts of sea level rise, including New Orleans and Miami. Projections
indicate that sea level will rise more rapidly throughout the rest of this
century and is expected to exacerbate existing threats in this region.[1]
Map of southeastern United States, which shows all coastal areas with a
moderate vulnerability to sea level rise. Mississippi, Louisiana,
Charleston, the Outer Banks, and Virginia Beach area show very high
vulnerability. The eastern and souther coasts of Florida show high
vulnerability. V
The Southeast experiences hurricanes from both the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane winds and storm surges have caused extreme
damage. In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused more than 1,800 deaths,
eroded more than 200 square miles of coastal land in Louisiana, and
destroyed personal property and public infrastructure.[4] Hurricane Katrina
alone caused an estimated $134 billion in damages. Average losses caused by
recent hurricane winds, land subsidence, and sea level rise are estimated
to be $14 billion per year.[1] These costs are expected to rise in the
future.
Sea level rise will erode shorelines, inundate wetlands, and impair the
operations of coastal infrastructure. Low-lying coastal areas are at higher
risk from frequent floods and storm surge. Low-lying inland areas could see
increased flooding from rain because stormwater drainage systems are at
risk of seawater inundation and slow draining.[1] The Southeast has
numerous cities, roads, rail systems, ports, airports, water supplies, and
oil and gas facilities located near sea level.[1] Damage to this
infrastructure will have large economic impacts.
https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts/southeast.html
Gays live along the coastlines... is there something divine in this
prediction?
This is more about haarp, not killing sodomy queers. The $ is why the
military does it. Its the same dam thing as 911. But this world, is to
dam stupid to understand God's Holy Bible.
Government Shill #2
2019-03-18 02:10:31 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Mar 2019 18:59:33 -0700, tesla sTinker
Post by tesla sTinker
Post by BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Corrupt Radical Rightist SenaTURD Jimmy Inhofe
The Southeast spans diverse landscapes from the Appalachian Mountains to
expansive coastal plains.[1] Most states in this region are along either
the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in 29,000 miles of
coastline.[2] Over 80 million people live in the Southeast, many of whom
reside in cities, including Jacksonville, Charlotte, Atlanta, Miami, and
New Orleans. Eleven of the twenty fastest growing metropolitan areas in the
nation are found here.[3]
Climate change is causing increases in temperature across the Southeast.
Since 1970, average annual temperatures in the region have increased by
about 2°F, with the greatest warming occurring during the summer.[1]
Temperatures are projected to increase by 4°F to 8°F by the end of the
century. There are also more predicted days over 95°F and fewer predicted
freezing events. Across the Southeast, temperatures will vary somewhat over
space and time. Inland areas are projected to warm more than coasts.
Natural cycles, including the El Niño Southern Oscillation, tropical
weather systems, and differences in atmospheric pressure across key regions
of the Earth, are anticipated to drive short-term temperature fluctuations.
[1]
This graph compares historic patterns of days above 95°F from 1971-2000 to
future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario with high greenhouse gas
emissions. Most of Florida, southern Georgia, and northern Louisiana are
projected to increase by more than 40 days. Most of Arkansas, Mississippi,
Alabama, western Tennessee and Kentucky, northern Georgia, South Carolina,
eastern / central North Carolina, and southeastern Virginia are projected
to increase between 20 and 40 days. All remaining parts of the Southeast
are projected to increase between 0 and 20 days. View enlarged image
The number of days reaching temperatures over 95°F in the Southeast is
projected to increase during this century. This graph compares historic
patterns from 1971-2000 to future estimates for 2041-2070 under a scenario
with high greenhouse gas emissions. Adapted from: USGCRP (2014)[5]
Heavy downpours have also increased in the Southeast. There has also been a
substantial increase in the intensity, frequency, duration, and strength of
Atlantic hurricane activity since the 1980s, and further increases are
projected. However, in addition to some very wet periods, the region has
also experienced periods of extreme drying. Projecting future precipitation
for the Southeast is challenging because the region lies in the transition
between an increasingly wet northern region and a drying southwest.[1]
Areas in southwestern portion of the Southeast region may experience drier
conditions, while the northeastern areas may experience wetter conditions,
with natural variability having a strong influence on patterns across the
entire region.[1]
Impacts on Sea Level and Coastal Resources
Coastal populations and ecosystems in the Southeast are threatened by sea
level rise, more intense hurricanes, and storm surge. Rising sea levels are
driven by both increased warming of oceans and ground subsidence (sinking).
[1][4] Many locations in the Southeast are extremely vulnerable to the
impacts of sea level rise, including New Orleans and Miami. Projections
indicate that sea level will rise more rapidly throughout the rest of this
century and is expected to exacerbate existing threats in this region.[1]
Map of southeastern United States, which shows all coastal areas with a
moderate vulnerability to sea level rise. Mississippi, Louisiana,
Charleston, the Outer Banks, and Virginia Beach area show very high
vulnerability. The eastern and souther coasts of Florida show high
vulnerability. V
The Southeast experiences hurricanes from both the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane winds and storm surges have caused extreme
damage. In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused more than 1,800 deaths,
eroded more than 200 square miles of coastal land in Louisiana, and
destroyed personal property and public infrastructure.[4] Hurricane Katrina
alone caused an estimated $134 billion in damages. Average losses caused by
recent hurricane winds, land subsidence, and sea level rise are estimated
to be $14 billion per year.[1] These costs are expected to rise in the
future.
Sea level rise will erode shorelines, inundate wetlands, and impair the
operations of coastal infrastructure. Low-lying coastal areas are at higher
risk from frequent floods and storm surge. Low-lying inland areas could see
increased flooding from rain because stormwater drainage systems are at
risk of seawater inundation and slow draining.[1] The Southeast has
numerous cities, roads, rail systems, ports, airports, water supplies, and
oil and gas facilities located near sea level.[1] Damage to this
infrastructure will have large economic impacts.
https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts/southeast.html
Gays live along the coastlines... is there something divine in this
prediction?
Hi sTinker,
Post by tesla sTinker
This is more about haarp,
HAARP? hahahhaahahahahahahahahaha!
Post by tesla sTinker
not killing sodomy queers. The $ is why the
military does it.
Does it? What? How much do they get?
Post by tesla sTinker
Its the same dam
Damn?
Post by tesla sTinker
thing as 911.
Oh, you mean bullshit then? Yeah, 911 conspiracies and HAARP conspiracies are
bullshit.
Post by tesla sTinker
But this world, is to
Too?
Post by tesla sTinker
dam
Damn?
Post by tesla sTinker
stupid to understand God's Holy Bible.
God's Holy Book is a work of fiction. Same as all the other holy books.

Shill #2
--
We are all atheists about most of the gods that societies have ever
believed in. Some of us just go one god further.
Richard Dawkins (1941 - ), "The Root of All Evil"
KWills Shill #3
2019-03-18 08:26:07 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Mar 2019 18:59:33 -0700, tesla sTinker
<***@truecarpentry.org> wrote:

[...]
Post by tesla sTinker
Post by BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Corrupt Radical Rightist SenaTURD Jimmy Inhofe
https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts/southeast.html
Gays live along the coastlines... is there something divine in this
prediction?
This is more about haarp,
How, in reality please, does the study of the ionosphere connect
to the delusional rant previously posted?
Post by tesla sTinker
not killing sodomy queers.
So you're safe then. Whew!
Post by tesla sTinker
The $ is why the
military does it.
How much do you think the military gets from the no longer in use
HAARP array?
Post by tesla sTinker
Its the same dam thing as 911.
So it's not even a little bit true. Got it.
Post by tesla sTinker
But this world, is to
dam stupid to understand God's Holy Bible.
Claims the dullard who can't understand the difference between
dam (a barrier constructed to hold back water) and damn (to be
condemned by a mythical god to suffer eternal punishment in hell).
BTW, most understand the Bible. They simply don't accept it as
anything more than a book of mythos.
--
Shill #3.
Los Angeles Branch.
Strategic Writer, Psychotronic World Dominator and FEMA camp
counselor.
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All hail the taco! http://www.taconati.org/
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