Discussion:
with france on 50C heatwave watch guess what happens to the nukes?
(too old to reply)
M***@kymhorsell.com
2018-08-02 17:49:02 UTC
Permalink
Assaad Razzouk @AssaadRazzouk 02 Aug 2018 11:42Z
On a related note: French utility EDF said France's heatwave could lead to
the shutdown from tomorrow of 4 nuclear reactors that depend on the Rhone
River's water for cooling, with another 4 further down the river at risk as
well *High time to join the dots* #climate twitter.com/AssaadRazzouk/#

--
Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change
This weekend's edition of the New York Times Magazine is dedicated in
full to a story detailing a 10-year period from 1979 to 1989, which
the magazine describes as a "decisive decade when humankind first came
to a broad understanding of the causes and dangers of climate
change". In an editor's note, the magazine's editor in chief Jake
Silverstein says: "With support from the Pulitzer Center, this
two-part article is based on 18 months of reporting and well over a
hundred interviews. It tracks the efforts of a small group of American
scientists, activists and politicians to raise the alarm and stave off
catastrophe. It will come as a revelation to many readers - an
agonizing revelation - to understand how thoroughly they grasped the
problem and how close they came to solving it." The 30,000-word
article is separated into a prologue, epilogue and 2 parts: 1979-82
and 1983-89. However, the article has attracted criticism from the
Atlantic. "By portraying the early years of climate politics as a
tragedy, the magazine lets Republicans and the fossil-fuel industry
off the hook," says writer Robinson Meyer. A second article in Think
Progress says that "scientists aren't impressed" with the magazine's
piece. Bob Brulle, a Drexel University sociologist and author of
numerous studies on climate politics and lobbying, told Think
Progress: "This article strikes me as a highly selective historical
account that omits key facts that run counter to its overall
narrative." New Republic writer Emily Atkin also criticises the
article. -- Nathaniel Rich, New York Times

Photos: Australia looks otherworldly in its extreme drought
Akshat Rathi, Quartz

Americans Think NASA Should Focus on Climate Change. Trump Doesn't
Riley Griffin and Justin Bachman, Bloomberg

Weather warns that time's running out on climate change
Richard Dixon, The Scotsman

Saving Earth: Don't Fall Into Climate Change Fatalism
Peter H Gleick, Huffington Post

Warmer soil is 'supercharging' bacteria and fungi to release more carbon and worsen climate change
Associated Press via MailOnline

Growing political storm around Trudeau climate change plan
Editorial, Toronto Star

How Greenland scorched its underside
Jonathan Amos, BBC News

How Atlantic upheaval will make future weather even more chaotic
Michael Marshall, New Scientist

A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too
Laurel Wamsley, NPR

Indonesia to make biodiesel use compulsory from Sept 1: official
Bernadette Christina Munthe, Reuters

..This is a terrible situation and Attorney General Jeff Sessions should
stop this Rigged Witch Hunt right now, before it continues to stain our
country any further. Bob Mueller is totally conflicted, and his 17 Angry
Democrats that are doing his dirty work are a disgrace to USA!
- Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 1, 2018

Al Jazeera Weather @AJEWeather 02 Aug 2018 05:56Z
European heatwave intensifies with temperatures above 40C in eastern
Portugal and southwestern Spain

Al Jazeera Weather @AJEWeather 02 Aug 2018 05:56Z
Warm air persists around Arctic Circle with 32C reported in Lapland, Finland

Al Jazeera Weather @AJEWeather 02 Aug 2018 05:56Z
Weekend temperatures could reach 50C on Iberian Peninsula

Russia's Gazprom 7m exports to non-CIS countries up 5.8 pct y/y
Reuters Africa, 01 Aug 2018 16:07Z
Moscow. Russia's Gazprom said on Wed its gas exports to non-CIS
countries were up 5.8% in the first 7 ...

Naftogaz hopes Swiss court will confirm legality of arrest of Gazprom ...
Kyiv Post, 01 Aug 2018 13:07Z
Naftogaz Ukrainy hopes that the Swiss court will confirm the legality of
seizure of Gazprom's assets in this country until Sept, Chief ...

Peak coal has been reached
ABC News, 02 Aug 2018 09:24Z
Australia is seeing a trade surplus. It's all about China, with coal
exports responsible for a large chunk of the net $1.9 bn this m.
Analysis say China's coal boom is a short-term related to a decline in
hydro power. China, like many other countries, is seeing a drought at
present. New coal plants in India and China have been more than
offset by plant closures in the US and elsewhere. Peak coal has been
reached says finance journalist Alan Kohler.

Tesla Inc
NASDAQ: TSLA - 2 Aug., 10:21 am GMT-4
329.50 USD +28.66 (9.53%) *** up 9.5% ***

Air France KLM SA
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8.38 EUR +0.25 (3.05%) *** up 3.1% ***

Facebook, Inc. Common Stock
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172.77 USD +1.12 (0.65%) up

Amazon.com, Inc.
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1,798.64 USD +1.47 (0.082%) even

Peabody Energy Corporation
NYSE: BTU - 2 Aug., 10:20 am GMT-4
42.43 USD -0.11 (0.26%) down

Gazprom PAO
MCX: GAZP - 2 Aug., 2:23 pm GMT+3
141.55 RUB -0.59 (0.42%) down

NK Rosneft' PAO
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414.65 RUB -1.95 (0.47%) down

Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation
NYSE: COG - 2 Aug., 10:19 am GMT-4
23.15 USD -0.14 (0.60%) down

Chevron Corporation
NYSE: CVX - 2 Aug., 10:21 am GMT-4
124.54 USD -0.83 (0.66%) down

Exxon Mobil Corporation
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79.81 USD -0.58 (0.72%) down

ConocoPhillips
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71.25 USD -0.56 (0.78%) down

Royal Dutch Shell Plc Class A
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BP plc (ADR)
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BHP Billiton Limited
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Bret Cahill
2018-08-02 21:53:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
On a related note: French utility EDF said France's heatwave could lead to
the shutdown from tomorrow of 4 nuclear reactors that depend on the Rhone
River's water for cooling, with another 4 further down the river at risk as
well *High time to join the dots* #climate twitter.com/AssaadRazzouk/#
You should have seen the nuke shutdowns back in the early Eocene!
Bret Cahill
2018-08-02 21:57:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change
This weekend's edition of the New York Times Magazine is dedicated in
full to a story detailing a 10-year period from 1979 to 1989, which
the magazine describes as a "decisive decade when humankind first came
to a broad understanding of the causes and dangers of climate
change". In an editor's note, the magazine's editor in chief Jake
Silverstein says: "With support from the Pulitzer Center, this
two-part article is based on 18 months of reporting and well over a
hundred interviews. It tracks the efforts of a small group of American
scientists, activists and politicians to raise the alarm and stave off
catastrophe. It will come as a revelation to many readers - an
agonizing revelation - to understand how thoroughly they grasped the
problem and how close they came to solving it." The 30,000-word
article is separated into a prologue, epilogue and 2 parts: 1979-82
and 1983-89. However, the article has attracted criticism from the
Atlantic. "By portraying the early years of climate politics as a
tragedy, the magazine lets Republicans and the fossil-fuel industry
off the hook," says writer Robinson Meyer. A second article in Think
Progress says that "scientists aren't impressed" with the magazine's
piece. Bob Brulle, a Drexel University sociologist and author of
numerous studies on climate politics and lobbying, told Think
Progress: "This article strikes me as a highly selective historical
account that omits key facts that run counter to its overall
narrative." New Republic writer Emily Atkin also criticises the
article. -- Nathaniel Rich, New York Times
The reason for the ridiculous "the Gipper would support taxing and regulating carbon" narrative is simple. They live in a dream world where lofty elites make all economic policy decisions so they do everything possible to undermine democracy.


Bret Cahill
Paul Aubrin
2018-08-04 21:08:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bret Cahill
The reason for the ridiculous "the Gipper would support taxing and
regulating carbon" narrative is simple. They live in a dream world
where lofty elites make all economic policy decisions so they do
everything possible to undermine democracy.
There is no 50°C heatwave in France. There were no nuclear plants the
last time (1947) 40°C+ temperatures, slightly greater than now, were
observed. But certainly, in that year, coal plants had the same cooling
problem as nuclear plants have now. Their output is curtailed to prevent
the water in rivers to become too warm.
Bret Cahill
2018-08-05 00:28:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Aubrin
Post by Bret Cahill
The reason for the ridiculous "the Gipper would support taxing and
regulating carbon" narrative is simple. They live in a dream world
where lofty elites make all economic policy decisions so they do
everything possible to undermine democracy.
There is no 50°C heatwave in France.
Wait until next year. You'll be begging Macron for more wind turbines and solar to run your AC.
Kym Horsell
2018-08-05 01:20:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bret Cahill
Post by Paul Aubrin
Post by Bret Cahill
The reason for the ridiculous "the Gipper would support taxing and
regulating carbon" narrative is simple. They live in a dream world
where lofty elites make all economic policy decisions so they do
everything possible to undermine democracy.
There is no 50°C heatwave in France.
Wait until next year. You'll be begging Macron for more wind turbines and solar to run your AC.
Given 12m youd spec a hillbilly could figure the difference between a
"heatwave watch" and a "temperature".

But den we have 30y of written ebidense two da contry...
Paul Aubrin
2018-08-05 05:08:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bret Cahill
Post by Paul Aubrin
Post by Bret Cahill
The reason for the ridiculous "the Gipper would support taxing and
regulating carbon" narrative is simple. They live in a dream world
where lofty elites make all economic policy decisions so they do
everything possible to undermine democracy.
There is no 50°C heatwave in France.
Wait until next year. You'll be begging Macron for more wind turbines
and solar to run your AC.
Even with four units stopped to conform to very strict green regulations,
there electricity generation is plentiful. Temperatures are by no mean
exceptional. During spring and summer 1947 they were higher everywhere.
They reached 40,2° in Nimes against 41.6°C on August 9. 1923. In 1947
they reached 40-41 throughout the country. But by then, there were no
greens so coal plants could go on producing. As far as I know, human made
warming was almost zero up to the 1970's. So what could cause those
record high temperatures in the 1920's and the 1970's?

http://www.meteo-paris.com/chronique/annee/1947

From July 27. to August 5: a truly Saharan heat invades all the county.
Temperatures reach 40°C in Angoulême, Toulouse, Bourges, Angers, Château-
Chinon, Orléans, Chartres, Paris (record high since the start of record
in 1873), and even 41°C in Poitiers.

Actual registered historical temperatures:
https://www.infoclimat.fr/climatologie-mensuelle/07630/aout/1947/toulouse-
blagnac.html
35.7°C during the extreme media heat of 2018, 40.2°C (+4.5) in August
1947.
Unum
2018-08-06 00:14:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Aubrin
Post by Bret Cahill
Post by Paul Aubrin
Post by Bret Cahill
The reason for the ridiculous "the Gipper would support taxing and
regulating carbon" narrative is simple. They live in a dream world
where lofty elites make all economic policy decisions so they do
everything possible to undermine democracy.
There is no 50°C heatwave in France.
Wait until next year. You'll be begging Macron for more wind turbines
and solar to run your AC.
Even with four units stopped to conform to very strict green regulations,
there electricity generation is plentiful. Temperatures are by no mean
exceptional. During spring and summer 1947 they were higher everywhere.
Were temperatures exceptional year after year with no end in sight? If
not why is aubrin bringing up his usual list of outliers?
Wally W.
2018-08-06 01:13:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Unum
Post by Paul Aubrin
Post by Bret Cahill
Post by Paul Aubrin
Post by Bret Cahill
The reason for the ridiculous "the Gipper would support taxing and
regulating carbon" narrative is simple. They live in a dream world
where lofty elites make all economic policy decisions so they do
everything possible to undermine democracy.
There is no 50°C heatwave in France.
Wait until next year. You'll be begging Macron for more wind turbines
and solar to run your AC.
Even with four units stopped to conform to very strict green regulations,
there electricity generation is plentiful. Temperatures are by no mean
exceptional. During spring and summer 1947 they were higher everywhere.
Were temperatures exceptional year after year with no end in sight? If
not why is aubrin bringing up his usual list of outliers?
No end in sight?!

How far can you see?

What can we learn from a jackass with myopia?

Blue
2018-08-03 01:13:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
On a related note: French utility EDF said France's heatwave could lead to
the shutdown from tomorrow of 4 nuclear reactors that depend on the Rhone
River's water for cooling, with another 4 further down the river at risk as
well
So, you're happy with no CO2 plants being shut down.

And coal plants picking up the slack.
Bret Cahill
2018-08-03 02:59:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change
This weekend's edition of the New York Times Magazine is dedicated in
full to a story detailing a 10-year period from 1979 to 1989, which
the magazine describes as a "decisive decade when humankind first came
to a broad understanding of the causes and dangers of climate
change". In an editor's note, the magazine's editor in chief Jake
Silverstein says: "With support from the Pulitzer Center, this
two-part article is based on 18 months of reporting and well over a
hundred interviews. It tracks the efforts of a small group of American
scientists, activists and politicians to raise the alarm and stave off
catastrophe. It will come as a revelation to many readers - an
agonizing revelation - to understand how thoroughly they grasped the
problem and how close they came to solving it." The 30,000-word
article is separated into a prologue, epilogue and 2 parts: 1979-82
and 1983-89. However, the article has attracted criticism from the
Atlantic. "By portraying the early years of climate politics as a
tragedy, the magazine lets Republicans and the fossil-fuel industry
off the hook," says writer Robinson Meyer. A second article in Think
Progress says that "scientists aren't impressed" with the magazine's
piece. Bob Brulle, a Drexel University sociologist and author of
numerous studies on climate politics and lobbying, told Think
Progress: "This article strikes me as a highly selective historical
account that omits key facts that run counter to its overall
narrative." New Republic writer Emily Atkin also criticises the
article. -- Nathaniel Rich, New York Times
The _NY Times_ actually _profits_ from being known as a shill for the rich. They consider it free "word of mouth" advertising. (This bidness plan works up to a point. Once everyone knows the _Times_ are shills then they are out of bidness altogether.)

That's why the climate scientists don't just come out and say that the _NY Times_ is once again peddling their "package" to their "sponsors" which is, of course, libertarianism / undermining democratic freedom / opposing the sovereignty of the people.

Libertarianism in the U. S. isn't being astro turfed from a single wide w/ a confederate flag draping the window. Most of it isn't even coming from the Koch Bros.

It's coming from the LOSIO (liberal on social issues only) legacy media.

LOSIO = looneytarianism


Bret Cahill
$27 TRILLION to PAY for KYOTO
2018-08-04 22:48:03 UTC
Permalink
It's 50C in France is it? It's 23 deg. in Paris as I write this...
Paul Aubrin
2018-08-05 05:27:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by $27 TRILLION to PAY for KYOTO
It's 50C in France is it? It's 23 deg. in Paris as I write this...
I confirm. It is a hoax. In very few locations near the Mediterranean sea
temperatures reached the high 30's and even 40°C, much less than during
the record years of the 1920's (1923) or the 1940's according to the
official records.

Nîmes registered the highest temperatures this year:
August 1. : min 21.7°C; max 40.2°C
August 2. : min 24.1°C; max 38.5°C
August 3. : min 23.3°C; max 37.5°C
August 4. : min 23.4°C; max 39.5°C
Historical record high: 40.2°C Aug. 9. 1923.
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