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england could run short of water in 25 y
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M***@kymhorsell.com
2019-03-19 10:10:44 UTC
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England could run short of water within 25 years
The Guardian reports comments from the Environment Agency's chief
warning that England could run short of water within 25 years. Water
demand from the country's rising population could soon surpass the
falling supply resulting from climate change, agency chief Sir James
Bevan told the Guardian. During a speech at the Waterwise conference
in London on Tue, Bevan said: "Water companies all identify the
same thing as their biggest operating risk: climate change." BBC News
and the Evening Standard also covers Bevan's speech, in which he says
he wants to see wasting water become "as socially unacceptable as
blowing smoke in the face of a baby". -- Damian Carrington, The Guardian

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Blue
2019-03-19 10:44:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
England could run short of water within 25 years
The Guardian reports comments from the Environment Agency's chief
warning that England could run short of water within 25 years.
Water
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
demand from the country's rising population
Lets say a place had double the usual population.

Why would the rain for that area know to be double too?





could soon surpass the
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
falling supply resulting from climate change, agency chief Sir James
Bevan told the Guardian. During a speech at the Waterwise conference
in London on Tue, Bevan said: "Water companies all identify the
same thing as their biggest operating risk: climate change." BBC News
and the Evening Standard also covers Bevan's speech, in which he says
he wants to see wasting water become "as socially unacceptable as
blowing smoke in the face of a baby". -- Damian Carrington, The Guardian
Bret Cahill
2019-03-19 15:20:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Blue
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
England could run short of water within 25 years
The Guardian reports comments from the Environment Agency's chief
warning that England could run short of water within 25 years.
Water
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
demand from the country's rising population
Lets say a place had double the usual population.
Why would the rain for that area know to be double too?
Xeriscape your golf courses. Paint the gravel and sand green so you can still call it "the green."

Once it catches on in Scotland as "green golf" the rest of the golfing world will follow.
Post by Blue
could soon surpass the
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
falling supply resulting from climate change, agency chief Sir James
Bevan told the Guardian. During a speech at the Waterwise conference
in London on Tue, Bevan said: "Water companies all identify the
same thing as their biggest operating risk: climate change." BBC News
and the Evening Standard also covers Bevan's speech, in which he says
he wants to see wasting water become "as socially unacceptable as
blowing smoke in the face of a baby". -- Damian Carrington, The Guardian
George
2019-03-19 19:11:02 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 19 Mar 2019 21:10:44 +1100
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
England could run short of water within 25 years
The Guardian reports comments from the Environment Agency's chief
warning that England could run short of water within 25 years. Water
demand from the country's rising population could soon surpass the
falling supply resulting from climate change, agency chief Sir James
Bevan told the Guardian. During a speech at the Waterwise conference
in London on Tue, Bevan said: "Water companies all identify the
same thing as their biggest operating risk: climate change." BBC News
and the Evening Standard also covers Bevan's speech, in which he says
he wants to see wasting water become "as socially unacceptable as
blowing smoke in the face of a baby".
Some -one has never visited Great Britain.
It rains there. LOTS
And the British Isles (islands are land totally surrounded by,in this
case, salt water) that can be treated by desalinization plants powered
by coal fired electrical generation


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