Discussion:
climate engineering is "perfectly safe"
(too old to reply)
M***@kymhorsell.com
2019-03-12 19:38:47 UTC
Permalink
Halving global warming with solar geoengineering could `offset
tropical storm risk'
Engineering the climate to reflect away sunlight could halve global
warming and offset the risk of increases in tropical storms, new
research suggests. The study finds that an idealised case of "solar
geoengineering" would not exacerbate extremes in temperature or water
availability for most world regions. The findings contrast with
earlier research suggesting that solar geoengineering could, under
certain circumstances, cause some regions to face amplified climate
impacts. -- Daisy Dunne, Carbon Brief

Radical proposal to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe,
new study claims
A new study "contradicts fears that using solar geoengineering to
fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm
patterns in some parts of the world", reports the Guardian. The
research, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, finds that
cooling the Earth enough to eliminate roughly half of warming, rather
than all of it, generally would not make tropical cyclones more
intense or worsen water availability, extreme temperatures or extreme
rain. "The analogy is not perfect but solar geoengineering is a little
like a drug which treats high blood pressure," lead author Dr Peter
Irvine, tells the Independent. "An overdose would be harmful, but a
well-chosen dose could reduce your risks," he adds. (Carbon Brief also
covers the story and interviews Irvine on camera.) However, as
co-author Dr David Keith explains to Axios: "This suggests solar
geoengineering could have large and equally distributed benefits, but
it doesn't prove it. It's an idealised model. There are still huge
uncertainties. And also it's clear that if misused, solar
geoengineering could have huge damages." Meanwhile, the Thomson
Reuters Foundations reports that the United Nations Environment
Assembly will this week consider whether to start assessing and
setting rules on solar geoengineering as well as negative emissions
technologies. -- Emily Holden, The Guardian

--
Upcoming events:
18 Mar 2019 Global SOTC NOAA
08 Apr 2019 2019Q1 $bn disasters NOAA


Emergence of robust precipitation changes across crop production areas
in the 21st century
Any amount of future climate change could alter rainfall patterns in
the world's major crop-growing regions, research finds. Using
modelling, the research team investigated how regional rainfall is
likely to change in parts of the world important for crop cultivation
under different levels of warming. The research finds that patterns of
increased precipitation in high latitudes, including areas in North
America and Europe, could emerge as early as the 2020s, or have
already emerged. Patterns of decreased precipitation in areas such as
the Mediterranean, western Mexico, Chile, South Africa, and Australia
could emerge by midcentury, the researchers add.
-- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Air temperature optima of vegetation productivity across global biomes
A study maps the optimum temperature for maximum plant productivity
(or growth) across the globe. The researchers say that tropical
forests, in particular, are already at their optimum growing
temperature and are likely to fall below optimum productivity "under
all scenarios of future climate". This suggests that there could be "a
limited safe operating space for these ecosystems under future
warming". -- Nature Ecology & Evolution

Robust abatement pathways to tolerable climate futures require
immediate global action
A study uses a Dynamic Integrated Climate-Economy (DICE) model to
"distangle" the potential impact of policies for climate change action
from "uncertainties" in the Earth's natural system. "Despite
wide-ranging [Earth system] uncertainties, the growth rate of global
abatement (a societal choice) is the primary driver of long-term
warming," the authors say. "It is not a question of whether we can
limit warming but whether we choose to do so." -- Nature Climate Change

Turning point: Meet the climate science denying, fossil fuel funded US
student group coming to a UK campus near you
Richard Collett-White, DeSmog UK

Pledge to cut emissions from dairy farms
BBC News

Iconic forests reaching climate tipping points in American West, study finds
Phil McKenna, InsideClimate News

Indonesia plans tax changes to drive output, exports of greener cars
Gayatri Suroyo, Reuters

BP launches new climate compliant marine fuel for shipping
Shadia Nasralla, Reuters

Bulgaria seeks investors to build Belene nuclear plant
Tsvetelia Tsolova and Angel Krasimirov, Reuters

From road pricing to rail freight: Why slashing transport emissions is
not as simple as going electric
Madeleine Cuff, BusinessGreen

Australia: Morrison govt has not ruled out supporting coal,
energy minister says
Katharine Murphy, The Guardian

Fukushima grapples with toxic soil that no one wants
Justin McCurry, The Guardian

China expands switch from polluting coal heating in 2018 - environment
minister
Meng Meng, Reuters

Climate change will make a walk in the woods a much rarer event
Jen Christensen, CNN

Australia: Even in its dying days, the govt denies the need for
climate action
Peter Lewis, The Guardian

That sinking feeling: Real estate in the age of climate change
Erik Kobayashi-Solomon, Forbes

Mortgage brokers get stay of execution as Government backs away from
commission ban
ABC News, 13 Mar 2019
With an election just weeks away, the Federal Government backs away from the
banking royal commission's recommendation that all commissions in the
mortgage broking industry be abolished.

'This is horrifying': Chinese database lists 'BreedReady' status of 1.8
mn women
ABC News, 13 Mar 2019
An unprotected database in China with the personal information of more
than 1.8 mn women - including their phone numbers, addresses and even a "
BreedReady" status - is uncovered by a Dutch cyber expert.

Low elevation forests finding it more difficult to regrow after fires due to
climate change
phys.org/Environment, 12 Mar 2019 13:00Z
A team of researchers from the University of Montana, the University of
Colorado and the US Forest Service has found evidence that suggests
low-elevation forests have difficult recoveries after forest fires due to
climate ...

Al Jazeera Weather @AJEWeather 12 Mar 2019 13:12Z
Clean-up operation gets underway in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal following
deadly flooding

Climate change could devastate painted turtles, according to new study
phys.org/Plants & Animals Ecology, 12 Mar 2019 13:23Z
An Iowa State University biologist is sounding the alarm for the painted
turtle, one of many reptiles for which climate change could prove
particularly threatening.

Researchers find trapdoor in SwissVote election system
phys.org/Security, 12 Mar 2019 13:59Z
A team of researchers have examined the source code published as part of the
SwissPost e-voting system, provided by Scytl, and discovered a cryptographic
trapdoor.

Animal carcasses were source of river nutrients
phys.org, 12 Mar 2019
Hundreds of years ago, when the number of animals roaming North America was
much higher than it is today, decomposing animal carcasses may have played a
substantial role in adding nutrients to the continent's rivers and streams. ...

First flight success for drone-sized electric aircraft
phys.org, 12 Mar 2019
If fully electric regional passenger jets someday fly from Cleveland to
Atlanta, aviation historians will likely point out that the first successful
in-air test of the battery technology making it possible happened on a
frozen ...

[Success!]
Legal advice shatters Theresa May's chances of Brexit vote success
ABC News, 13 Mar 2019
The British Prime Minister appears hours from another humiliating defeat
after legal advice suggests her Brexit deal could lead to the UK remaining
tied to the European Union indefinitely.

Donald Trump says planes are 'too complex to fly' in wake of Ethiopian
Airlines crash
ABC News, 13 Mar 2019
The President tweets about the glory days before it took
"scientists from MIT" to fly a plane, as a growing list of nations boycott
the Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft.

Shareholders win out over workers from corporate revenue windfall
ABC News, 11 Mar 2019 09:14Z
The recent corporate reporting season shows shareholders have received a
much greater dividend from corporate revenue growth than the companies'
workers, analysts say.

Japan trade commissioner fixed $700 bathhouse massages for MPs, CCC says
ABC News, 12 Mar 2019 09:16Z
WA's commissioner in Tokyo is sacked after the Corruption and Crime
Commission finds he engaged in a decade of corruption which cost taxpayers
more than $500,000, including organising bathhouse massages for 2 Liberal MPs.

Consumers urged to 'look local' as Tasmanian icon set to close
ABC News, 12 Mar 2019 09:17Z
Prominent Tasmanian retailer Coogans is set to close its doors at the end of
June, marking the end of a chain that has been a Tasmanian institution for
more than a century.

EPA head rules out future negotiations with California over car emissions
The Hill, 12 Mar 2019 16:20Z
Newly confirmed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chief Andrew Wheeler
blamed politics Mon in ruling out any reopening of talks between the Trump ...

Toyota Will Land a Rover on the Moon in 2029
PCMag, 12 Mar 2019 16:23Z
Toyota, with the help of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA),
intends to allow 2 astronauts to go for an extended joy ride on the Moon
10 years ...

Without federal help, local govts are trying to save coal
Ars Technica, 12 Mar 2019 17:19Z
Deals to purchase failing coal plants have different results around the country.

<https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03-13/climate-data-reveals-australias-worst-affected-regions/10892710>
Extreme weather: Australia's insurance red zones set to expand
ABC/Digital Story Innovation Team, 12 Mar 2019 19:07Z
Extreme weather in some of the country's worst-affected regions is now twice
as common as usual. Explore the data to see the risk to your area.

Exxon, Chevron planning big expansions in shale drilling, a move which could
shake up the industry
CNBC, 11 Mar 2019
Big oil is getting even bigger in shale, and that could speed up a shakeout
among independents and force more mergers and joint ventures.

VW says it accelerates plan for 22 mn electric vehicles in 10 yrs as
part of decarbonization plan
Electrek, 12 Mar 2019 13:10Z
Volkswagen announced today its intention to accelerate its electrification
effort as part of its decarbonization plan by adding 20 more "electric models"
to its ...

Hyundai Motor Co
KRX: 005380 - 12 Mar, 3:30 pm GMT+9
125,500 KRW +4,500 (3.72%) *** up 3.7% ***

Sony Corp
TYO: 6758 - 12 Mar, 3:00 pm GMT+9
5,153 JPY +128 (2.55%) *** up 2.6% ***

Panasonic Corporation
TYO: 6752 - 12 Mar, 3:00 pm GMT+9
994 JPY +21 (2.20%) *** up 2.2% ***

Kia Motors Corporation
KRX: 000270 - 12 Mar, 3:30 pm GMT+9
34,600 KRW +700 (2.06%) *** up 2.1% ***

Whitehaven Coal Ltd
ASX: WHC - 12 Mar, 4:10 pm AEDT
4.42 AUD +0.050 (1.14%) *** up 1.1% ***

BHP Group Ltd
ASX: BHP - 12 Mar, 4:10 pm AEDT
36.91 AUD +0.39 (1.07%) *** up 1.1% ***

MITSUBISHI MOTORS CORPORATION
TYO: 7211 - 12 Mar, 3:00 pm GMT+9
603 JPY +6 (1.01%) *** up 1% ***

EPA: AIR - 12 Mar, 2:54 pm GMT+1
113.90 EUR +0.94 (0.83%) up

Woodside Petroleum Limited
ASX: WPL - 12 Mar, 4:10 pm AEDT
34.96 AUD +0.26 (0.75%) up

Siemens AG
ETR: SIE - 12 Mar, 2:39 pm GMT+1
96.20 EUR +0.40 (0.42%) up

Bayerische Motoren Werke AG
ETR: BMW - 12 Mar, 2:39 pm GMT+1
73.35 EUR +0.17 (0.23%) up

Gazprom PAO
MCX: GAZP - 12 Mar, 4:54 pm GMT+3
151.52 RUB -0.080 (0.053%) even

Air France KLM SA
EPA: AF - 12 Mar, 2:55 pm GMT+1
10.61 EUR -0.080 (0.75%) down

NK Rosneft' PAO
MCX: ROSN - 12 Mar, 4:54 pm GMT+3
395.45 RUB -4.30 (1.08%) *** down 1.1% ***
gordo
2019-03-13 17:45:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
Halving global warming with solar geoengineering could `offset
tropical storm risk'
Engineering the climate to reflect away sunlight could halve global
warming and offset the risk of increases in tropical storms, new
research suggests. The study finds that an idealised case of "solar
geoengineering" would not exacerbate extremes in temperature or water
availability for most world regions. The findings contrast with
earlier research suggesting that solar geoengineering could, under
certain circumstances, cause some regions to face amplified climate
impacts. -- Daisy Dunne, Carbon Brief
Radical proposal to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe,
new study claims
A new study "contradicts fears that using solar geoengineering to
fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm
patterns in some parts of the world", reports the Guardian. The
research, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, finds that
cooling the Earth enough to eliminate roughly half of warming, rather
than all of it, generally would not make tropical cyclones more
intense or worsen water availability, extreme temperatures or extreme
rain. "The analogy is not perfect but solar geoengineering is a little
like a drug which treats high blood pressure," lead author Dr Peter
Irvine, tells the Independent. "An overdose would be harmful, but a
well-chosen dose could reduce your risks," he adds. (Carbon Brief also
covers the story and interviews Irvine on camera.) However, as
co-author Dr David Keith explains to Axios: "This suggests solar
geoengineering could have large and equally distributed benefits, but
it doesn't prove it. It's an idealised model. There are still huge
uncertainties. And also it's clear that if misused, solar
geoengineering could have huge damages." Meanwhile, the Thomson
Reuters Foundations reports that the United Nations Environment
Assembly will this week consider whether to start assessing and
setting rules on solar geoengineering as well as negative emissions
technologies. -- Emily Holden, The Guardian
Meanwhile the oceans would continue to absorb CO2.

---
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R Kym Horsell
2019-03-13 17:51:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by gordo
Post by M***@kymhorsell.com
Halving global warming with solar geoengineering could `offset
tropical storm risk'
Engineering the climate to reflect away sunlight could halve global
warming and offset the risk of increases in tropical storms, new
research suggests. The study finds that an idealised case of "solar
geoengineering" would not exacerbate extremes in temperature or water
availability for most world regions. The findings contrast with
earlier research suggesting that solar geoengineering could, under
certain circumstances, cause some regions to face amplified climate
impacts. -- Daisy Dunne, Carbon Brief
Radical proposal to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe,
new study claims
A new study "contradicts fears that using solar geoengineering to
fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm
patterns in some parts of the world", reports the Guardian. The
research, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, finds that
cooling the Earth enough to eliminate roughly half of warming, rather
than all of it, generally would not make tropical cyclones more
intense or worsen water availability, extreme temperatures or extreme
rain. "The analogy is not perfect but solar geoengineering is a little
like a drug which treats high blood pressure," lead author Dr Peter
Irvine, tells the Independent. "An overdose would be harmful, but a
well-chosen dose could reduce your risks," he adds. (Carbon Brief also
covers the story and interviews Irvine on camera.) However, as
co-author Dr David Keith explains to Axios: "This suggests solar
geoengineering could have large and equally distributed benefits, but
it doesn't prove it. It's an idealised model. There are still huge
uncertainties. And also it's clear that if misused, solar
geoengineering could have huge damages." Meanwhile, the Thomson
Reuters Foundations reports that the United Nations Environment
Assembly will this week consider whether to start assessing and
setting rules on solar geoengineering as well as negative emissions
technologies. -- Emily Holden, The Guardian
Meanwhile the oceans would continue to absorb CO2.
As they said -- it's like treating high blood pressure.
The drugs used can actually *cause* angina and even a heart attack.
But it's better than being paralyzed with fear & stoopidity and doing
nothing at all which seems to be the treatment so far.

--
[Polar Vortex:]
Zack Labe @ZLabe 13 Mar 2019 04:06Z
Unlike earlier in the winter, the stratospheric polar vortex is currently
quite intense high above the North Pole! Maps: wxcharts.com
pic.twitter.com/oEUHI1rtci
<Loading Image...>

Climate Signals @ClimateSignals 06 Mar 2019 14:48Z
NEW PAGE: Annotated science backgrounder on the #polarvortex dip that
brought frigid temperatures to the U.S. this week buff.ly/2H4JkWi
pic.twitter.com/MS5NJnMwTI
<Loading Image...>

Zack Labe @ZLabe 26 Feb 2019 03:59Z
New study linking Siberian cooling and anomalous upward wave activity to the
weakened polar vortex (-NAO) in November/December 2016. The temperature
anomaly pattern in October 2016 was a remarkable case of "Warm Arctic, Cold
Continent" + @theAGU GRL Paper
<https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2018GL081580>
pic.twitter.com/iM4WGsUlkw
<Loading Image...>

Michael E. Mann @MichaelEMann 06 Feb 2019 00:39Z
Replying to @partialtomusic @Curious01703258 @guardian
The polar vortex is a feature of our atmosphere. Where climate change may be
having an effect is in WEAKENING the polar vortex, causing more of these
"polar vortex breakdown" events (which allow cold Arctic air masses to
plunge down into the U.S. and Eurasia).

Assaad Razzouk @AssaadRazzouk 01 Feb 2019 23:43Z
In just a couple of days, 90 million people - a third of the US - have
experienced temperatures of -17?C (0?F) or below; while 250 million
Americans experienced #PolarVotex2019 so far. Welcome to the age of brutal
climate change. #ActOnClimate pic.twitter.com/AT5FIO2JkP
<Loading Image...>

Gavin Schmidt @ClimateOfGavin 31 Jan 2019 16:05Z
From @eroston. Cold snaps are getting less common.
bloomberg.com/news/articles/# pic.twitter.com/pGI6NP1hnl
[Decline in US "cold wave index" 1970-2017:]
<Loading Image...>

Assaad Razzouk @AssaadRazzouk 31 Jan 2019 13:03Z
It's currently 25?C colder in Chicago than in Anchorage, Alaska
#ActOnClimate #PolarVotex2019 pic.twitter.com/dvWaDuv86l
<Loading Image...>

Peter Gleick @PeterGleick 31 Jan 2019 04:09Z
Just did a radio interview with @CBC in Whitehorse, the Yukon, about
#climatechange and the #PolarVortex. They get it. It's 50 degrees warmer
there than Chicago. They want their winter back. pic.twitter.com/e8V4WyQrU5
<Loading Image...>

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