Discussion:
These Distinctions Between Deniers, Wild Bearded Capuchin Monkeys & Earlier Simians Are Purty Useless
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Bret Cahill
2019-03-15 02:55:27 UTC
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Wild bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) in Serra da Capivara National Park have been observed smashing stones against rocks embedded in the ground. The resulting 'shaped' rocks and flakes are similar to early hominid tools and flakes. It has been suggested that similar behavior, by earlier simians, might account for what have been regarded as human tools at Pedra Furada.

https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Pedra_Furada
Kym Horsell
2019-03-15 06:15:51 UTC
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Post by Bret Cahill
Wild bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) in Serra da Capivara National Park have been observed smashing stones against rocks embedded in the ground. The resulting 'shaped' rocks and flakes are similar to early hominid tools and flakes. It has been suggested that similar behavior, by earlier simians, might account for what have been regarded as human tools at Pedra Furada.
https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Pedra_Furada
I think K. Flanagan explained it best.
The French have only the one word -- singe -- for ape and for monkey.
Which renders the famous scene from "Planet of the Apes" thus:
"Singe? SINGE? I am not singe! I am SINGE! There's a difference!"
(To which French audiences of the time typically reacted:
"Yes, how true").

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